Dance
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{Carmina Burana} By Lynne Taylor-Corbett

At the start of April, the Carolina Ballet embarked on a new choreographic project with Duke’s Nasher Museum on their Alexander Calder exhibit.  All three of the pieces were unique, each in turn taking inspiration from Calder’s imagination. Timour Bourtasenkov’s work presented Calder’s wittiness, while Zalman Raffael’s work showed the classicism and purity of the art. Tyler Walters’s work individualized the mobiles’ pieces (by each dancer) to construct the mobile in front of audience.  I was in the latter of the three pieces and I enjoyed every second of the experience. It was incredible being able to watch the mind of the choreographers unravel, while you make it humanly possible.

Picking the shoes. Photo by © Tim Lytvinenko.

Since I joined the company three seasons ago in 2009, many donors and dancers have raved about this piece, even stating it was the company’s best theatrical production. Luckily, I had the opportunity to be part of the production this April. One of the unique elements of the piece, as a dancer, is the use of character shoes instead of pointe shoes.  The corps de ballet women rotate through three different colored/styled heeled shoes within the hour-long ballet.  Every time we are off stage, we are either adding to our basic costumes or completely changing outfits and shoes!  The powerful acting component of Lynne’s choreography grasps the dancers’ passion and the audiences’ attention. We bowed to a standing ovation every show.

Testing shoes. Photo by © Tim Lytvinenko.

Fixing hair. Photo by © Tim Lytvinenko.

Carmen Felder in the Women’s Corps Dressing Room. Photo by © Tim Lytvinenko.

Lara O’Brien and Eugene C. Barnes III in the middle of Tyler Walter’s “I Mobile.” Photo by © Tim Lytvinenko.

Richard Krusch. Photo by © Tim Lytvinenko.

Zalman Raffael. Photo by © Tim Lytvinenko.

Lara O’Brien resting in the middle of Tyler Walter’s “I Mobile.” Photo by © Tim Lytvinenko.

Legs. Photo by © Tim Lytvinenko.

Ashley Hathaway in Lynne Taylor Corbett’s “Carmina Burana.” Photo by © Tim Lytvinenko.

Taverna Scene in Lynne Taylor Corbett’s “Carmina Burana.” Photo by © Tim Lytvinenko.

Lara O’Brien, Attila Bongar, and dancer of the Taverna Scene in Lynne Taylor Corbett’s “Carmina Burana.” Photo by © Tim Lytvinenko.

Dancers in Lynne Taylor Corbett’s “Carmina Burana.” Photo by © Tim Lytvinenko.

For more of Tim’s photos: http://newtim.com/category/ballet/

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1 Comment

  1. Margarita Suarez says

    I like your blog and hope that you will continue writing. We met briefly when I was waiting for Ruben Suarez to finish a rehearsal for Chinese a couple of years ago. I’m his mom. You were new at CB at that time and I didn’t really recognize you. What I know now is what a talented dancer you are and how you project your love of ballet across the footlights. You should be a soloist now!! Also I’m sorry to hear about Alain and Attila. They shouldn’t have been let go. Alain was the perfect partner and I loved Attila’s new choreographed ballets. They will be missed by those of us who’ve been season ticket holders for years. Looking forward to a wonderful new season. Best, Margarita Suarez

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