Dance
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{Hungarian Dances} By Robert Weiss

The {Master Composers} program presents the progression of music history through dance, from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. The mélange of ten great composers each created these pieces for dance, but they haven’t been choreographed to until now.

Featured composers – Chopin, Byrd, Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Granados, Brahms, Stravinsky, Adam, Tchaikovsky.

The program was inspired by the success of last season’s {Four Seasons}.

The program opens and closes with the full company dancing to, first, Chopin’s 1841 {Polonaise in F-sharp Minor} and, ending, Peter Tchaikovsky’s 1879 {Waltz from Eugene Onegin}.

I particularly adore the {Waltz} ball gown dresses that have the score imprinted onto the skirts’ textiles. Dancing to this piece reminds me of George Balanchine’s {Vienna Waltz}, which I have always dreamed of dancing. 

Pointe shoes, gloves and music notes. Instagram taken by Cecilia Iliesiu, 2015.

Pointe shoes, gloves and music notes. Instagram taken by Cecilia Iliesiu, 2015.

In addition to dancing in the {Polonaise} & {Waltz}, I dance in Brahms’ {Hungarian Dances}, choreographed by our director, Robert “Ricky” Weiss. Being partly Hungarian myself, I was thrilled to visit my heritage through dance.

Thank you to {Armes Photography} for the photographs below. Please “Like” them on Facebook.

{Hungarian Dances} Cecilia Iliesiu & Oliver Béres. Photo taken by Armes Photography, 2015.

{Hungarian Dances} Cecilia Iliesiu & Oliver Béres. Photo taken by Armes Photography, 2015.

{Hungarian Dances} Alicia Fabry & Adam Schiffer. Photo taken by Armes Photography, 2015.

{Hungarian Dances} Alicia Fabry & Adam Schiffer. Photo taken by Armes Photography, 2015.

{Hungarian Dances} Jan Burkhard & Richard Krusch. Photo taken by Armes Photography, 2015.

{Hungarian Dances} Jan Burkhard & Richard Krusch. Photo taken by Armes Photography, 2015.

Three principle and four soloist couples are featured in 8 of the 21 lively pieces Brahms composed.

My first movement is a sultry pas de deux with Oliver Béres to {Hungarian Dance No. 2 in D minor: Allegro non assai}. Ricky started the entire ballet with this pas de deux and it is such fun to be sassy.

My second movement to {Hungarian Dance No. 4 in F-minor: Poco sostenuto} is a emotional whirlwind. The music has 7 sections alternating between dramatic and moody, to bright and energetic.

During Ricky’s choreographic process, he always listens to the music first with the dancer to set the scene and get a feel for the movement he is about to create. I remember listening to each new solo and it was more dramatic than the last. I worried about reflecting and filling the music’s emotions to my own movement. I am fortunate to have numerous performances to dig deeper into my character.

{Hungarian Dances} Cecilia Iliesiu. Photo taken by Ted Salamone, 2015.

{Hungarian Dances} Cecilia Iliesiu. Photo taken by Ted Salamone, 2015.

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7 Comments

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